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Certified Nursing Assistant (CNAs)

Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) work under the supervision of nurses and other licensed medical professionals as vital members of the healthcare team. Certified Nursing Assistants provide basic direct patient care to assist with daily living activities. They fulfill critical roles in various medical communities, including skilled nursing facilities, hospitals, rehabilitation centers, and hospice and home health arenas.

A Certified Nursing Assistant job description tends to include a vast array of different tasks that may change on a day to day basis, some of the duties may include:

  • Measure patients’ vital signs, including temperature, blood pressure, pulse rate, and respiration
  • Assist patients with daily living activities, such as bathing, dressing, eating, brushing teeth, and using the restroom
  • Reposition and transfer patients from their beds to wheelchairs, walkers, or other mobile medical equipment for transportation
  • Record patients’ health concerns and maintain reports of provided information for nurses to review
  • Perform safety techniques, including CPR and first aid, in emergency situations

Certified Nursing Assistants not only provide necessary patient assessment, they are often a source of great emotional and physical support for the patients. CNAs work with patients daily to engage with them to provide much needed interaction.  When nursing assistants are employed in residential care facilities and nursing homes, they often provide round the clock assistance for the patients’ personal care. If patients are unable to meet their own daily personal needs, CNAs offer tremendous support for effectively completing these everyday activities. Bedridden patients also depend on the nurse aides to turn or reposition them according to an established schedule for healing and comfort purposes. Overall, Certified Nursing Assistants are warm, caring, and trained individuals that are driven to help improve patients’ lives in multiple ways.

Certified Nursing Assistant (CNAs)

Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) work under the supervision of nurses and other licensed medical professionals as vital members of the healthcare team. Certified Nursing Assistants provide basic direct patient care to assist with daily living activities. They fulfill critical roles in various medical communities, including skilled nursing facilities, hospitals, rehabilitation centers, and hospice and home health arenas.

A Certified Nursing Assistant job description tends to include a vast array of different tasks that may change on a day to day basis, some of the duties may include:

  • Measure patients’ vital signs, including temperature, blood pressure, pulse rate, and respiration
  • Assist patients with daily living activities, such as bathing, dressing, eating, brushing teeth, and using the restroom
  • Reposition and transfer patients from their beds to wheelchairs, walkers, or other mobile medical equipment for transportation
  • Record patients’ health concerns and maintain reports of provided information for nurses to review
  • Perform safety techniques, including CPR and first aid, in emergency situations

Certified Nursing Assistants not only provide necessary patient assessment, they are often a source of great emotional and physical support for the patients. CNAs work with patients daily to engage with them to provide much needed interaction.  When nursing assistants are employed in residential care facilities and nursing homes, they often provide round the clock assistance for the patients’ personal care. If patients are unable to meet their own daily personal needs, CNAs offer tremendous support for effectively completing these everyday activities. Bedridden patients also depend on the nurse aides to turn or reposition them according to an established schedule for healing and comfort purposes. Overall, Certified Nursing Assistants are warm, caring, and trained individuals that are driven to help improve patients’ lives in multiple ways.

Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN):

Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) provide basic direct patient care under the supervision of registered nurses, doctors, and other medical professionals. A LPN often provides  a variety of tasks to provide assistance for injured, ill, disabled, and other patients throughout a range of different healthcare environments.

Not only do licensed practical nurses provide medical care to patients, they provide invaluable support for healthcare professionals. LPNs must complete an accredited vocational training program and pass an obtain a license to begin practicing in the profession.

Licensed Practical Nurse Duties:

  • Monitor patients’ health by measuring vital signs, including blood pressure, pulse rate, and temperature
  • Administer basic patient care, such as changing bandages, dressing wounds, inserting catheters, and collecting bodily fluids for laboratory analysis
  • Maintain detailed records on patients’ treatment, progress, and overall health
  • Report patients’ status to registered nurses, doctors, and other involved medical professionals
  • Administer medications and intravenous (IV) drips
  • Educate patients’ families on how to provide necessary care for their injured or ill loved ones

Licensed practical nurses are often employed in nursing homes, residential care facilities, hospitals, private group homes, clinics, and physician’s offices. Duties of LPNs tend to vary, depending on the setting in which they are employed.

LPNs that work in nursing homes or residential facilities may provide assistance for elderly patients with hygiene, eating, and using medical equipment for transportation. LPNs often have to help lift patients that have difficulty walking, standing, and getting out of bed. Although these duties can be stressful, licensed practical nurses lead a rewarding profession of direct patient care and are vital members of the health care team.

Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN):

Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) provide basic direct patient care under the supervision of registered nurses, doctors, and other medical professionals. A LPN often provides  a variety of tasks to provide assistance for injured, ill, disabled, and other patients throughout a range of different healthcare environments.

Not only do licensed practical nurses provide medical care to patients, they provide invaluable support for healthcare professionals. LPNs must complete an accredited vocational training program and pass an obtain a license to begin practicing in the profession.

Licensed Practical Nurse Duties:

  • Monitor patients’ health by measuring vital signs, including blood pressure, pulse rate, and temperature
  • Administer basic patient care, such as changing bandages, dressing wounds, inserting catheters, and collecting bodily fluids for laboratory analysis
  • Maintain detailed records on patients’ treatment, progress, and overall health
  • Report patients’ status to registered nurses, doctors, and other involved medical professionals
  • Administer medications and intravenous (IV) drips
  • Educate patients’ families on how to provide necessary care for their injured or ill loved ones

Licensed practical nurses are often employed in nursing homes, residential care facilities, hospitals, private group homes, clinics, and physician’s offices. Duties of LPNs tend to vary, depending on the setting in which they are employed.

LPNs that work in nursing homes or residential facilities may provide assistance for elderly patients with hygiene, eating, and using medical equipment for transportation. LPNs often have to help lift patients that have difficulty walking, standing, and getting out of bed. Although these duties can be stressful, licensed practical nurses lead a rewarding profession of direct patient care and are vital members of the health care team.

Registered Nurse (RN):

Registered Nurses (RNs) are not limited to working in hospital settings. RN nurses can also work within clinics, schools, assisted living facilities, homes, schools and more. They can also specialize in areas such as cardiac care, midwifery, family practice, geriatrics, labor and delivery and emergency nursing. A registered nurse would have to attend to patients at the time of diagnosis and during the recuperation or recovery phases if applicable. A nurse would be responsible for explaining reports to patients, administer medicine, conduct medical tests, and interpret test results. RNs also work very closely with physicians and therefore play a major role in the coordination and planning of a patient’s care,

Increased access to healthcare and an aging Baby Boomer population have led to high demand for registered nurses. In fact, employment for RNs is projected to increase 15 percent through 2026.

The daily duties can vary greatly depending on the healthcare setting. But on an average day, RN nurses might:

  • Observe and record patient behavior
  • Perform  physical exams and diagnostic tests
  • Collect patient health histories
  • Counsel patients and their families
  • Educate patients about treatment plans
  • Administer medications, wound care, and other treatment options
  • Interpreting patient information and making decisions about necessary actions, where appropriate
  • Consult with nurse supervisors and physicians to determine best treatment plans for patients
  • Direct and supervise the care of other healthcare professionals, including licensed practical nurses, certified nurse assistants, and nurse aides
  • Conduct research to improve patient outcomes and healthcare processes

Nurses are constantly on their feet, stretching, bending, and standing. Therefore, nursing can be a strenuous job. In addition, exposure to infectious diseases and hazardous substances is also common. Nurses in the hospital and SNF setting work long hours and are usually assigned in shifts, due to patients needing 24 hour care. Nights, weekends, and holidays in addition to being on call are often required. Those who work outside of this setting such as in schools, offices, or other places have regular schedules.

There are three paths to become an RN: a bachelor’s degree in nursing, an associate’s degree, or a diploma/certificate from an approved nursing program. Some nurses earn a master’s or doctoral-level degree and work in management, research, or academic settings. Combining competence with compassion, nursing is a career that improves many lives.

Registered Nurse (RN):

Registered Nurses (RNs) are not limited to working in hospital settings. RN nurses can also work within clinics, schools, assisted living facilities, homes, schools and more. They can also specialize in areas such as cardiac care, midwifery, family practice, geriatrics, labor and delivery and emergency nursing. A registered nurse would have to attend to patients at the time of diagnosis and during the recuperation or recovery phases if applicable. A nurse would be responsible for explaining reports to patients, administer medicine, conduct medical tests, and interpret test results. RNs also work very closely with physicians and therefore play a major role in the coordination and planning of a patient’s care,

Increased access to healthcare and an aging Baby Boomer population have led to high demand for registered nurses. In fact, employment for RNs is projected to increase 15 percent through 2026.

The daily duties can vary greatly depending on the healthcare setting. But on an average day, RN nurses might:

  • Observe and record patient behavior
  • Perform  physical exams and diagnostic tests
  • Collect patient health histories
  • Counsel patients and their families
  • Educate patients about treatment plans
  • Administer medications, wound care, and other treatment options
  • Interpreting patient information and making decisions about necessary actions, where appropriate
  • Consult with nurse supervisors and physicians to determine best treatment plans for patients
  • Direct and supervise the care of other healthcare professionals, including licensed practical nurses, certified nurse assistants, and nurse aides
  • Conduct research to improve patient outcomes and healthcare processes

Nurses are constantly on their feet, stretching, bending, and standing. Therefore, nursing can be a strenuous job. In addition, exposure to infectious diseases and hazardous substances is also common. Nurses in the hospital and SNF setting work long hours and are usually assigned in shifts, due to patients needing 24 hour care. Nights, weekends, and holidays in addition to being on call are often required. Those who work outside of this setting such as in schools, offices, or other places have regular schedules.

There are three paths to become an RN: a bachelor’s degree in nursing, an associate’s degree, or a diploma/certificate from an approved nursing program. Some nurses earn a master’s or doctoral-level degree and work in management, research, or academic settings. Combining competence with compassion, nursing is a career that improves many lives.

Testimonials

Nicole Esposti

I am currently attending school for my RN, and I’m really grateful for the tuition assistance I received from Cambria Care Center through their NurseTrack program.

Nicole Esposti

Kim Smith

The NurseTrack program was extremely helpful as I continue my schooling

Kim Smith

Nearby Universities

Westmoreland County Community College WCCC

RN Program and Bridge LPN to RN Program

Allegheny College of Maryland

LPN and RN Program

Conemaugh

RN Program

Penn State

RN Program

Mount Aloysius

RN and Bridge LPN to RN Program

Saint Francis

RN Program

IUP

Bridge LPN to RN Program

GJCTC

LPN Program

Rapha School

LPN Program

GACTC

LPN Program

Somerset CCTC

LPN Program

Clearfield County CTC

LPN Program

Central Pa Institute of Science and Technology

LPN Program

Huntingdon CCTC

LPN Program

Indiana CCTC (LPN programs) – Indiana Campus Full Time

LPN Program

Connellsville Campus Part Time

LPN Program

Nearby Universities

Westmoreland County Community College WCCC

RN Program and Bridge LPN to RN Program

Allegheny College of Maryland

LPN and RN Program

Conemaugh

RN Program

Penn State

RN Program

Mount Aloysius

RN and Bridge LPN to RN Program

Saint Francis

RN Program

IUP

Bridge LPN to RN Program

GJCTC

LPN Program

Rapha School

LPN Program

GACTC

LPN Program

Somerset CCTC

LPN Program

Clearfield County CTC

LPN Program

Central Pa Institute of Science and Technology

LPN Program

Huntingdon CCTC

LPN Program

Indiana CCTC (LPN programs) – Indiana Campus Full Time

LPN Program

Connellsville Campus Part Time

LPN Program

Get Started

 

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